Israel and Hamas have agreed to an Egyptian-proposed truce in Gaza to resolve the 11-day war

The Israeli government has agreed to a truce with Hamas and Palestinian Islamic Jihad, which Egypt suggested, ending 11 days of rocket attacks on Israel and IDF bombing of Gaza. On Thursday evening local time, Israeli media announced that National Security Adviser Meir Ben Shabbat had been allowed to begin talks with Egypt on the ceasefire plan, to hammer out the specifics and a start date. Egypt suggested the cease-fire, which would be "mutual and unconditional," according to an Israeli cabinet announcement.

Israel and Hamas have agreed to an Egyptian-proposed truce in Gaza to resolve the 11-day war

The Israeli government has agreed to a truce with Hamas and Palestinian Islamic Jihad, which Egypt suggested, ending 11 days of rocket attacks on Israel and IDF bombing of Gaza.

On Thursday evening local time, Israeli media announced that National Security Adviser Meir Ben Shabbat had been allowed to begin talks with Egypt on the ceasefire plan, to hammer out the specifics and a start date. Egypt suggested the cease-fire, which would be "mutual and unconditional," according to an Israeli cabinet announcement.

Meanwhile, a Hamas official told Reuters that a “mutual and simultaneous” cease-fire with Israel would start at 2 a.m. local time on Friday.


According to one Israeli reporter, a truce could already be in place, as no rockets have been fired from Gaza for the past 90 minutes. Shortly afterwards, however, air raid sirens started to sound in southern Israel.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has previously stated that Israeli operations will continue until the goal of restoring "quiet and stability" is met, while Hamas has stated that talks on a truce will only begin once Israel ceases "its aggression in Jerusalem and its bombardment of Gaza."

The possibility of a truce came only hours after Russia declared that its civilians, as well as those of former Soviet republics, would be evacuated from Gaza, after telling Israel on Wednesday that "an rise in the number of civilian casualties would be unacceptable."

After Israeli police clashed with Palestinian demonstrators outside the Al-Aqsa mosque on Jerusalem's Temple Mount, Hamas and Palestinian Islamic Jihad started firing rockets into Israel on May 10. The conflict was sparked by a dispute over Palestinians being evicted from Jerusalem's Sheikh Jarrah neighborhood. Since then, Gaza has launched over 4,000 rockets into Israeli territory.

While the Iron Dome missile defense system intercepted the majority of them, about a tenth managed to get through. The majority of the strikes were in areas along the Gaza Strip, such as Sderot and Ashkelon, but some went as far as Jerusalem and Tel Aviv suburbs. In the meantime, Israeli aircraft, helicopters, tanks, and artillery bombed Gaza, destroying a number of high-rise buildings.

At least 230 Palestinians have been killed in Gaza, according to Gaza authorities, while Israel has confirmed 12 casualties.